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Deep Work by Cal Newport 📖

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I’ve found I need uninterrupted time to focus for software projects at work, and actually leave work unsatisfied if I’m unable to find this time. While investigating what this is all about, I came across Newport’s Deep Work.

The first half of the book makes a case for investing in focus time, especially for folks performing “knowledge work”, which can require workers to hold many details in mind to produce significant output. The second half of the book provides practical recommendations for how to set aside uninterrupted time.

Focus time

Like Paul Graham’s Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule, the first recommendation is to explicitly identify and reserve time for focused work, which I found validating.

In practice, I find a couple common sources of distractions:

  • random requests and discussions via email, chat, etc
  • random requests and discussions around my desk area

The book recommends avoiding interruptive electronic communications, especially social media, when trying to focus, and makes a case that most interruptions can wait.

Regarding in-person interruptions, the author mentions sequestering himself in a library. I might try something similar.

One challenge I see: focus requirements might be dependent on when as well as what. For example, the early days of a project might be meeting-heavy as requirements are clarified, and then focus-heavy as pieces are built.

My current experiment is to reserve 8-10 and 2-5 for focus work. During these times, I’ll sit away from my desk and ignore chat and email. This leaves a couple hours before and after lunch to catch up on electronic communication, have spontaneous discussions and provide a reasonable window for scheduling meetings.

The book cites research indicating our ability to work deeply maxes out around four hours, which also aligns with my experience. I previously experimented with reserving 1-5, but found it was too restrictive for natural interactions with colleagues, and I didn’t need the entire time anyway.

In an effort to provide “ownership” for my project, I took pains to be aware of all changes and support requests. This obviously doesn’t scale, but I appreciated reading a supportive quote from Tim Ferris:

Develop the habit of letting small bad things happen. If you don’t, you’ll never find time for the life-changing things.

Productivity

An interesting aspect of this book is it’s not simply presenting thoughts on the topic of deep work; it was motivated by the author’s need to optimize productivity. In this context, the book introduced me to 4DX, which is like agile boiled down to four points. As with agile, I find myself referencing it often.

In particular, I appreciate the emphasis on prioritization; during focused effort, we say “no” to many things so we can say “yes” to the most important things.

The book also mentions the idea of “results-driven reporting”, which defers meetings until there’s something new to report, as an alternative to status updates. This aligns with recommendations to prioritize requirements and blockers over status updates in cadence meetings from a recent talk on politically-charged projects.

Written by Erik

October 6, 2019 at 6:41 pm

Posted in book